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How's your toilet paper?


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I thought this would be a fun and somewhat interesting topic to throw up.

As corona/covid-19 discussions are on  the news everyday its really making a lot of people anxious. 

I was conducting interviews a few weeks back for new hires, and one potential candidate voiced his concerns about his safety well working in case the virus showed up in our city. As this is something that we can't necessarily control we did discuss the use of proper hygiene and what would occur if it say popped up in one of our employees. 

He ended up not taking the job (this was a highschool kid) his mom lives in Taiwan and told him to not work right now - because of the dangers. 

Anyways, now there are people who are clearing shelves of toilet paper in Canada. I know its bad in Australia as well....but....Canada doesn't have any outbreaks and the people who have contracted the virus are those who came back from cruises (not passed to random strangers).

It seems people are seeking out toilet paper because it's big, its a 1st world comfort and everyone is leaving shelves bare and fueling the fear.

 

I think its silly. What are your thoughts? How's your cities toilet paper supply? What are some bizarre things you've noticed?

Edited by Nyxnine
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Toilet paper shmoilet paper.

I find the 2019-nCoV response by the population at large, the media, and the politicians to be pretty bizarre, frankly.  The fact of the matter is that the reported death rate for people aged 10-50 is

Looks like "he went to Jared."

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There's a Soviet Russia joke in here somewhere, I'm sure of it.  I'm starting to have to crack down on my workforce because of their commentary/deliberation on COVID-19.  The paranoia is ridiculous and unwarranted.  I don't exactly know that there's a "toilet paper situation" here.  We're pretty distant from any cases, the closest is Chicago.

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@The History Kid aw man, I want to hear this joke now.

I agree it is ridiculous. I mean, yes, its good to protect yourself...but in a logical way. Its just another form of the flu.(worse for elderly, sick, weak immune systems, children). 

Its crazy though, Netflix had aired pandemic in Canada and it talks about the spread of the flu. Was interesting timing haha.

My friend sent me a snapchat where he was holding a bag of bounty and some royale leaning over them as if he was just in a battle. With a tag "spoils of war"

He's in Edmonton. Which...just sounds funny on its own if you know anything about Canada.

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I find the 2019-nCoV response by the population at large, the media, and the politicians to be pretty bizarre, frankly.  The fact of the matter is that the reported death rate for people aged 10-50 is 0.2%, and the actual death rate is probably far lower, since a lot of people with the virus seem to have mild, or even no symptoms and thus go unreported.  (In fact, that's one of the problems in trying to contain the virus.. people with no symptoms can nevertheless still infect other people.)  For MOST people, certainly anyone between 10 and 50 years old, the worst that can happen is you feel like shit for a few days, you stay in bed, drink your fluids and watch TV, then you get well.  That's it.

To be sure, there' a serious problem in that there's no vaccine yet.  Even the regular flu would be pretty serious without a vaccine.  Even if there were a vaccine, this virus is (slightly) worse than the usual flu in terms of symptoms and its contagiousness.  If you have very young children or are older then there is definitely some cause for concern.  I'm 55.  My mom is pushing 80.  Even for the normal flu we do tend to get our yearly vaccination.  Without a vaccine the major problem is this older/younger cohort of people, large numbers of whom will die without a vaccine.  Especially if they all get sick at once and modern medical services get overwhelmed.  For instance, there's ~60,000 ICU bays in US hospitals.  About 20,000 of those are already in use, mainly supporting people who have fallen ill with the regular flu.  If we have 1/3rd of our resources already taken up by a disease for which there IS a vaccine, what's going to happen when the one for which we DON'T have one gets out of control?  THAT is the real problem here.

Unfortunately the press is all about revving people up these days, not informing people.  Our "leaders" too have their heads up their behinds.  So we now have people in the general population with little to no actual science or medical knowledge being directed by inane Presidental tweets or listening to uninformed talking heads in the media, and then panicking over shortages of toilet paper.  I hate to imagine what they're going to do when the body count of old people dying from the disease starts climbing.  We are truly the descendants of the B-shippers.

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I'm not one to panic but it never hurts to be prepared so yes, I have stocked up on items such as extra toilet paper, over the counter meds, non-perishable food items, etc. I stay fairly well stocked on these items anyway, so I just picked up a few additional of each. No crazy hoarding of bottled water or anything like that. There is no shortage of anything in my area that I'm aware of & no sense of panic either, 

To anyone who is currently in an area that is being severely impacted by this outbreak though, I hope that you & your family are doing well! 

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Is it really that bizarre? It's something “new” to focus on and is affecting a lot of people. It's hard to gauge political input from my end though (especially because you're viewing it from the States side) – it's not really discussed as much here from a political stand point EXCEPT, all the mention about financial blowback after the fact. Money....But, then again, I don't know, I feel like its been handled well and is organized when it comes to finding people who are sick. And....I don't use twitter lol.

 

I have a few friends who are nurses here and they're already dealing with an influx of flu cases right now. However, we have become so blasé to the flu and how bad it can actually be I don't think people who are 20's-40's really think that much about it unless they are in the medical field. I worked as an Optician for 7 years and would get the flu shot because it was offered during the day at work by the clinic owners. However, I have never sought out getting immunized. That being said, when my sister had a baby I did go on my own volition BECAUSE of my nephew being born.

Even with the shot though, there are variations of strain when it comes to the flu, so even being inoculated doesn't always help. But, those who are vulnerable will go out of their way to protect themselves, as they should.

Back to the media, they have been discussing each case, each death from all around the world, and so of course you're going to be panicked hearing it all the time. I would be freaked out if they started discussing anything negative over and over again for months.

It's true that a lot of the symptoms will go unnoticed, also – quarantined people my foot, there is a lady in Calgary Alberta who was on the California princess cruise, quarantined for 14 days, no symptoms came home and then almost a week later had the virus and now they've had to close down the business she was working at, and she is now again self quarantining until she is healthy again. I think a lot of people are reflecting on how it is popping up – but in Canada, for example, the people who are popping up are those who are coming back from travelling, not from receiving it from having it transferred randomly with no known connections.

As for the vaccine, I have another friend who is a phlebotomist and she was mentioning the trial vaccines they received a the hospital shes at. She deals with research – and I know that there has been a a lot of joint efforts to find a vaccine globally so hopefully something will come up soon to help those who are vulnerable. But, hospitals are already overwhelmed under the flu season so places that aren't prepped to take on so many people – that is scary – BUT, I would feel more nervous for 3rd world countries where the infrastructure isn't there.

 

But, yes to much revving of fears, and then FOMO, because once something is out of place enough times, it will keep on catching. Please don't go out and buy more toilet paper. Hahah

@efaardvark also....ps. Because I'm really not cool with slangs – what is B-shippers? haha

Image may contain: 2 people, possible text that says 'Unfortuantely the tests came back positive for COVID-19. You have coronavirus. That can't be correct. I have over 40 cases of costco water and 200 rolls of toilet paper.'

10 minutes ago, RuthisianCodex said:

I'm not one to panic but it never hurts to be prepared so yes, I have stocked up on items such as extra toilet paper, over the counter meds, non-perishable food items, etc. I stay fairly well stocked on these items anyway, so I just picked up a few additional of each. No crazy hoarding of bottled water or anything like that. There is no shortage of anything in my area that I'm aware of & no sense of panic either, 

To anyone who is currently in an area that is being severely impacted by this outbreak though, I hope that you & your family are doing well! 

Also, honestly, as long as you're just making sure you're stocked for a month or two, I don't see a real issue. Furthermore, no battle royales happening to gain said supplies. AND, you're getting ACTUAL necessities like meds and food. That at least is logical to me haha

Edited by Nyxnine
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I can't think of a single situation where panicking has ever made things better so I just do my best to remain calm, look at the facts that are available, & go from there. Like I said earlier, I keep certain items stocked in my house at all times so I'm good there. I've also started taking a real good & honest look at my health over the last year & have put practices into place such as working out on a daily basis, watching what I eat, etc. because I believe in preventing problems before they start when possible. In all outbreaks like this, the people who will be the most affected are those with medical issues or compromised immune systems so I believe that improving one's health is one of the best weapons in situations like this. 

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19 minutes ago, Nyxnine said:

That being said, when my sister had a baby I did go on my own volition BECAUSE of my nephew being born.

Thank you.  That's a good deed.  Babies can't get immunized, so if the people around them can do so it helps the child. 

That's what all the hand-washing with this SARS variant is about now too.  Right now there's no way to vaccinate people, so even though people in their 20s and 30s have pretty much nothing to worry about personally it indirectly helps all the people that they interact with.  Some of THOSE people might be in for serious problems if they get it.

Stockpiling toilet paper and bottled water isn't helping.  The best thing people can do is wash their hands several times a day with soap and water for at least 30 seconds.  You won't get sick, and us old folk will appreciate it.

 

About that B-Ship thing.

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Seriously, it all comes down to hygiene.  Wash your damn hands, and don't eat food off the floor.  I'm a bit of an germophobe anyway, that doesn't stop me from getting sick, but it does cut down on my chances.  That being said - as it's been mentioned before - if you're healthy, clean conscious, and aren't of the ancient age of 70+, you're pretty much gold. 

The only impacts to me as it stands right now has been the stock markets and my 401K.  I haven't lost any money yet, but my YTD's are all negative or near negative.  That'll correct itself as soon as people wake up and realize that COVID-19 isn't the "be-all-end-all disaster bug" that they think it is.  I'd be more worried about the Plague getting into the homeless population - which it's starting to in California.

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ID-19 isn't the "be-all-end-all disaster bug" that they think it is. 

1 hour ago, The History Kid said:

I'd be more worried about the Plague getting into the homeless population - which it's starting to in California.

An excellent point that no one is talking about on the news. Which is baffling to me, not only as an advocate for the homeless in my area but also as someone with just flat out common sense, that a vast, at risk section of our communities is just being totally overlooked for the most part. 

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The “news” reporting is not useful.  Even by their own alarmist standards they’re not even doing their reporting right.  For instance, according to the CDC regular old H1N1 has already killed 136 children so far this flu season.  You would think they’d be all over that.  Apparently they don’t care.  (Or worse, they don’t even know.. this info is in the CDC’s usual weekly reports, available to all on their web page.)  They would rather report on toilet paper shortages.  I’d ask my dog for advice before I’d listen to anyone on the “news”.

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I think it's a good idea to cover this within the workforce. Simply just for preparation's sake. It's unbelievable how unhygienic some people can be. This is kind of grey area for me because I lived a few blocks away from where individuals with COVID-19 were placed in quarantine. Not to mention someone walked out of the place without discharge and began infecting others. We had another case that led to a major shopping center to be down for a day of sterilization, and it was within walking distance of my former residence. I moved not too long ago but family in the area say it's causing a stir. Not just with empty shelves and bad temperament but with a genuine domino effect from the disease itself. We took those with COVID-19 into a heavily populated hospital and stuck them in rooms ordinarily used for TB patients. Some of them were let go from work due to the lengthy quarantine period (that may end up being extended) and I can't imagine people financially hurting from this. The cherry on the cake was that this hospital was already dealing with a bad flu season.

I can see why people are in a panic though. COVID-19 was taken pretty casually until it actually started becoming a major issue in some areas. I mean, one cruise liner doing more bad than good; under the worst decision making possible — wasn't enough. People still had the invincibility mentality and vacationed anyway, until the disease fell upon a second ship. Then they're out there complaining to their government and demanding already overworked staff to treat them ASAP. To example the power of negligence.  

The majority of the scare comes from little to no treatment structure for those that might be impacted with underlying health issues and no vaccination. With a promise scope of a year before such a thing might be possible. A few days ago, I heard a guy say "out of sight out of mind" which I feel is the more prominent vibe in most. I'm not so sure if that's a good approach? I know SARS had a much larger mortality rate but COVID-19 is highly communicable, leaving a lot of people out of commission longer. Even getting re-infected a second time. Don't know how it might impact economic costs if the disease starts to spread at a rate that can't be manageable in certain departments. It's also unknown at this time if the disease may mutate between now and any vaccination completion. Considering not too long ago they just discovered that the survival period of the disease on contact surfaces might be much longer.

Serious irresponsibility from people end up creating more tension, I think. Like the Pope coughing all over his hands and then proceeding to shake and kiss with others by the masses. Before getting a proper diagnosis. Governments proposing to be prepared and simultaneously struggling with their lack of staff and products. 

We also have fake reports and information, store owners that are price gouging and a possibility of medication manufactured in China having delay issues.

Personally, I'll be cautious without being too paranoid. Only because there's no vaccination and my grandmother lives with me. She is already immensely compromised and it would not do her well to catch this. I would also worry that I won't be able to take care of her or my pets, if it happens to hit me in some severe way. I can't even be positive how this might effect my job. So I have other people and situations around me that I'm considering. I'd like to respect how serious it is/might be for those in poverty or those less likely to receive immediate medical attention. Let alone live where hygiene and sanitization are a priority. It might not be all that critical for some but it is for others. Where doctors are said to pass out on the floors from exhaustion, and disabled children/children in general with no other guardians, are a huge concern.

Additionally heard that the U.S. failed containment measures and are now looking into ways to preserve national health and economy efforts? Could be hogwash but it's getting more difficult to take public information with assurance these days. 

If anything, this is a real trial to look attentively at. What's considered ridiculous now will be tenfold when something more threatening comes along. People continue to prove that they're not entirely ready for such a thing.

Other than that, my toilet paper is doing just fine. Thanks for asking. 😆

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I didn´t have the time (and since I live an almost hermit-like lifestyle, nor the interest) to look into it too much, but from the few studies there are and I´ve seen, it doesn´t seem to be that bad, especially not as bad as it is portrayed in the media. This doesn´t mean that it couldn´t theoretically mutate into something much worse though.
Stockpiling stuff might not be that bad an idea, since I wouldn´t be surprised if stores in some places close because of the hysteria (also generally speaking it is not a bad idea to have reserves in case of unexpected incidents).

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It hasn't reached my area yet, but working on what's effectively our frontline in dealing with it, we've been doing what we can and taking due diligence. There is a worldwide PPE shortage due to this, and with much of the manufacturing of such items coming from China, it's a bit of a concern in the healthcare world. Our site has adopted new temporary guidelines which create a "skeleton minimum" PPE requirement so we aren't using any unnecessary equipment. We also have information posted in our lobbies informing patients/visitors that the masks are only to be used by those presenting cough/sore throat/discharge symptoms in order to cut back on unneccessary waste. Masks are ineffective in preventing sickness in uninfected people, so it's a waste to wear one of you are otherwise healthy. 

Our EVS staff has been excellent and responds quickly when we need them; they don't hesitate to UV any area which has been exposed to any contamination and it's given us a little peace of mind knowing our facilities are prepared. We have many elderly and/or immunocompromised patients in our care, so we are taking this seriously. 

My advice to anyone concerned about contracting the virus is to: 

1) Wash hands frequently (especially after using toilet or handling money)

2) Use hand sanitizer in addition to hand washing

3) If in public spaces, keep some pocket virucide wipes available (Cavi, Lysol, etc) and use them as a barrier between your hands and anything you might touch such as door handles, public seats, or shopping baskets. 

There's no need to "stock up" on supplies unless you are severely low and live alone. Have some available in case you find yourself needing to be quarantined at home. This isn't a hurricane or other natural disaster. Practice proper hand hygiene and don't engage in risky behaviour- your chances of being infected will go way down. 

Edited by Wedgy
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Unfortunately for me, the virus has already reached my area.

I've already stocked up on things that would definitely be wiped from the shelves once panic starts kicking in like food and such.

Now, all I need to do is isolate myself from society by living in my room until the vaccine arrives. Just like a normal day.

Yes, I do have toilet paper.

 

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3 hours ago, Illusion of Terra said:

not sure I should even ask, but what does 'rape chalk' mean here 😂

I have a keyboard app on my mobile which is super goofy about autocorrecting. I start to type "could" and it changes it to "xoxo". It evidently decided I meant to say "rape chalk" and I didn't catch it in time. I need to get a new one for sure. 

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Oh man, I saw that video today! @RuthisianCodex =-=;;;

Also that made me laugh @The History Kid

 

I liked this video - start it at 039 to get past the intro. 

---- and the video was deleted

Sparks notes:

The flu isn't sexy anymore, so the news will only talk about crazy new things and make it bigger than it is. Still I wish the video was still there. 

Edited by Nyxnine
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I can still find plenty of them where i live thankfully and i just wish this whole Corona virus thing blows over like how the h1n1 virus did soon.

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Just watched that video and gotta say, that's a lot of toilet paper. do people stockpile for months? That doesn't seem to make a lot of sense. If any kind of shutdown lasts for less than a month then you won't need all that toilet paper. If it lasts for more than a month then I assume you will have worse problems to deal with than toilet paper, such as no running water or electricity. Unless you have your own water and electricity supply, stockpiling for such a long time doesn't seem to make much sense.

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