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WiFi Names


Sakura

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  • 2 months later...

I have kept my WiFi name the name it came as with the cable company but I have saw some funny names people used. Mostly I will see a lot of ones named of FBI Surveillance Vans or called Don't Steal My WiFi. 

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20 hours ago, viruxx said:

'ISpankMyWifi' was probably the funniest one I've seen so far. 🤣

Okay someone is weird with their wifi XD

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2 minutes ago, Sakura said:

Okay someone is weird with their wifi XD

I guess their Wifi is really naughty or something. 🤣

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On 4/24/2024 at 11:32 PM, viruxx said:

'ISpankMyWifi' was probably the funniest one I've seen so far. 🤣

Wth LOL

 

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On 4/24/2024 at 11:32 PM, viruxx said:

'ISpankMyWifi' was probably the funniest one I've seen so far. 🤣

Does that classify as a relationship with a robot or rather technology? We have finally arrived at the future?

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1 hour ago, Zeref said:

 

Does that classify as a relationship with a robot or rather technology? We have finally arrived at the future?

You’re asking the wrong guy here. I wasn’t exactly curious enough to go ask the owner of that network about it. 🤣

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59 minutes ago, viruxx said:

You’re asking the wrong guy here. I wasn’t exactly curious enough to go ask the owner of that network about it. 🤣

I think it's one of those questions that we're better off not knowing the answer to. 😄

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1 hour ago, viruxx said:

You’re asking the wrong guy here. I wasn’t exactly curious enough to go ask the owner of that network about it. 🤣

Good. You might have find yourself in a situation you didn't wanted to be in lol 

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So we're back to violence towards recalcitrant consumer electronics?  :D
 

Spoiler

At the risk of dating myself, this reminded me of the Old Days, before transistors were made of silicon.  Back then electronic devices such as TVs and radios were made of "tubes", large-scale (relative to silicon transistors) metal constructions placed inside of sealed containers usually made of glass from which all the air had been removed.  Kind of like an incandescent light bulb, only the metal bits were more complicated.  Anyway, such devices required high voltages to function, and high voltage tended to cause the connections to these devices to corrode / oxidize on a regular basis.  You could make the connections more reliable by soldering or welding them, but like light bulbs these "tubes" tended to burn out and need replacing every so often so in most consumer devices they were socketed.  (Usually the corner drugstore or convenience store would have some sort of self-serve apparatus where you could bring in your tubes, test them, and buy a replacement from a nearby rack if one or more turned up bad.)  This led to the common situation where the contacts would degrade just enough to affect the operation of the tube, but the tube itself was still functional.  The approved method of dealing with such a situation was to open up the TV or radio and unplug/replug the tube(s) until things worked again.  This would rub the contacts together and (usually) scrape away the thin layer of oxidation that was typically causing the problem.  Unfortunately the insides of older TVs usually contained many such tubes, and re-seating all of them was a bit of a job.  (Unless you were able to consult the schematic included with most such devices as part of the documentation and could tell exactly which one to reseat.  Did I mention the high voltage that was often retained by these tubes for long periods even after removal of power?)

So the frowned-upon but commonly used method to get these vintage consumer-electronic devices functioning correctly again was to just give them a whack, which would jostle the multitude of connections inside and often produce the desired results.    :D

 

Edited by efaardvark
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2 hours ago, Zeref said:

Good. You might have find yourself in a situation you didn't wanted to be in lol 

I think Viruxx should go check it out and come back and tell us what he found in the house it belongs to 😂

 

1 hour ago, efaardvark said:

So we're back to violence towards recalcitrant consumer electronics?  :D
 

  Hide contents

At the risk of dating myself, this reminded me of the Old Days, before transistors were made of silicon.  Back then electronic devices such as TVs and radios were made of "tubes", large-scale (relative to silicon transistors) metal constructions placed inside of sealed containers usually made of glass from which all the air had been removed.  Kind of like an incandescent light bulb, only the metal bits were more complicated.  Anyway, such devices required high voltages to function, and high voltage tended to cause the connections to these devices to corrode / oxidize on a regular basis.  You could make the connections more reliable by soldering or welding them, but like light bulbs these "tubes" tended to burn out and need replacing every so often so in most consumer devices they were socketed.  (Usually the corner drugstore or convenience store would have some sort of self-serve apparatus where you could bring in your tubes, test them, and buy a replacement from a nearby rack if one or more turned up bad.)  This led to the common situation where the contacts would degrade just enough to affect the operation of the tube, but the tube itself was still functional.  The approved method of dealing with such a situation was to open up the TV or radio and unplug/replug the tube(s) until things worked again.  This would rub the contacts together and (usually) scrape away the thin layer of oxidation that was typically causing the problem.  Unfortunately the insides of older TVs usually contained many such tubes, and re-seating all of them was a bit of a job.  (Unless you were able to consult the schematic included with most such devices as part of the documentation and could tell exactly which one to reseat.  Did I mention the high voltage that was often retained by these tubes for long periods even after removal of power?)

So the frowned-upon but commonly used method to get these vintage consumer-electronic devices functioning correctly again was to just give them a whack, which would jostle the multitude of connections inside and often produce the desired results.    :D

 

"Giving them a whack" is exactly what I do most of the time so I guess nothing has changed 🤭

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35 minutes ago, Sakura said:

"Giving them a whack" is exactly what I do most of the time so I guess nothing has changed 🤭

I beg to differ.  Back then the rationale for the whack had a valid backing in physics.  Now with everything being low-voltage silicon components wave-soldered onto circuit boards it's just tradition.

Probably also a bit of exasperated venting.  I'll admit that part hasn't changed.  :D

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18 minutes ago, efaardvark said:

I beg to differ.  Back then the rationale for the whack had a valid backing in physics.  Now with everything being low-voltage silicon components wave-soldered onto circuit boards it's just tradition.

Probably also a bit of exasperated venting.  I'll admit that part hasn't changed.  :D

Oh yes I meant nothing has changed related to how we all still deal with the problem lol we like to just hit things and hope it works after that 😂

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1 hour ago, Sakura said:

I think Viruxx should go check it out and come back and tell us what he found in the house it belongs to 😂

I would.... but I don't wanna. 😱

spacer.png

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2 hours ago, viruxx said:

I would.... but I don't wanna. 😱

spacer.png

Wonder if you can be bribed with a fountain pen to further investigate this WiFi lol 🤔

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6 hours ago, efaardvark said:

So we're back to violence towards recalcitrant consumer electronics?  :D
 

  Reveal hidden contents

At the risk of dating myself, this reminded me of the Old Days, before transistors were made of silicon.  Back then electronic devices such as TVs and radios were made of "tubes", large-scale (relative to silicon transistors) metal constructions placed inside of sealed containers usually made of glass from which all the air had been removed.  Kind of like an incandescent light bulb, only the metal bits were more complicated.  Anyway, such devices required high voltages to function, and high voltage tended to cause the connections to these devices to corrode / oxidize on a regular basis.  You could make the connections more reliable by soldering or welding them, but like light bulbs these "tubes" tended to burn out and need replacing every so often so in most consumer devices they were socketed.  (Usually the corner drugstore or convenience store would have some sort of self-serve apparatus where you could bring in your tubes, test them, and buy a replacement from a nearby rack if one or more turned up bad.)  This led to the common situation where the contacts would degrade just enough to affect the operation of the tube, but the tube itself was still functional.  The approved method of dealing with such a situation was to open up the TV or radio and unplug/replug the tube(s) until things worked again.  This would rub the contacts together and (usually) scrape away the thin layer of oxidation that was typically causing the problem.  Unfortunately the insides of older TVs usually contained many such tubes, and re-seating all of them was a bit of a job.  (Unless you were able to consult the schematic included with most such devices as part of the documentation and could tell exactly which one to reseat.  Did I mention the high voltage that was often retained by these tubes for long periods even after removal of power?)

So the frowned-upon but commonly used method to get these vintage consumer-electronic devices functioning correctly again was to just give them a whack, which would jostle the multitude of connections inside and often produce the desired results.    :D

 

About 20 years ago we had this huge monitor that often switched itself off, we found that a swift WHACK on the right hand side woke it up again.

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1 hour ago, Animedragon said:

About 20 years ago we had this huge monitor that often switched itself off, we found that a swift WHACK on the right hand side woke it up again.

Yes, proper placement and intensity was often part of the art of the whack.  Someone untutored in the art could shake a malfunctioning device, kick it, beat it up all day without "fixing" it.  Finally in desperation one would have to call maintenance.  The guy from maintenance would come up, take a look at the symptoms, maybe ask a few questions, then give it the right <thwack> in the right place and there you go, instant fix.  Guess that's why he was paid the big bucks.  🤣 🛠️ 

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17 hours ago, Sakura said:

I think Viruxx should go check it out and come back and tell us what he found in the house it belongs to 😂

 

"Giving them a whack" is exactly what I do most of the time so I guess nothing has changed 🤭

Sending him there, we will never see him again.

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15 hours ago, efaardvark said:

Yes, proper placement and intensity was often part of the art of the whack.  Someone untutored in the art could shake a malfunctioning device, kick it, beat it up all day without "fixing" it.  Finally in desperation one would have to call maintenance.  The guy from maintenance would come up, take a look at the symptoms, maybe ask a few questions, then give it the right <thwack> in the right place and there you go, instant fix.  Guess that's why he was paid the big bucks.  🤣 🛠️ 

Quite correct. It's the years of experience that go into knowing where to whack that you're paying for. 🙂

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4 hours ago, Zeref said:

Sending him there, we will never see him again.

Possibly true so maybe better we don't. 

@Topic today I was on the train and a wifi name came up called "JAMESWISACHEATER" 🤭 So Apparently whoever James W. is he made someone mad. 

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