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What Book are you Reading?


Beocat
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Hey all, I figure there are probably some bibliophiles around here like me so let's share our books and maybe we'll find some interesting titles among us.

 

I'm current reading the third book in The Sword and the Staff series, A Draw of Kings. Found the first two books at the local library and fell in love. The series is about a young drunk who becomes forced by the church to travel to join a readers conclave, and becomes a hero along the way. I love the writing and character development (set in medieval type of times). Errol is exceptionally well written and the plot is never dull. I highly advise the series so far :)

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I used to read constantly.  I guess i still do, but these days it is more web pages, tech manuals, and training material.  :)  I really haven't read that many actual books this year.  I started on Leviathan Wakes, the first book in the Expanse series, but I kind of lost interest and haven't made any progress recently.  The whole Ceres thing required a bit too much suspension of disbelief for me.  I think the last book I finished was either O'Neill's 2081 (a reread) or Mahaffey's Atomic Accidents.  Not sure when that was though.  Besides the other two books in the Expanse series, in my to-read stack I still have the last 3 issues of Analog magazine (a science fiction/fact periodical) as well.  A couple times in the last year or so I've had the urge to go back and re-read some older, "classic" SF.  Maybe Niven's Known Space stuff.  Or Banks' Culture series.  I hear they're going to be making a movie out of Consider Phlebas.  Might also be interesting to reread stuff like Heinlein's The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress with the ongoing Bezos/Musk rivalry in mind.  :D

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I'm currently reading The Fall of Dragons, the last book of Miles Cameron's Traitor Son Cycle (Link to the 1st book). Amazing series, I have to say. Miles Cameron is pretty good at making a medieval Fantasy world historically authentic which I haven't seen before, (The fact that he's a historian, HEMA practitioner and medieval enthusiast helps, though), his prose is great, though sometimes a bit hard for a non native speaker like me, everyone of his (countless) characters feels unique, as well does the magic system, and the world he crafted is intriguing.

I'm waiting for a Box Set of the Monogatari  (I got it on amazon) novels by Nisio Isin to arrive (Since it gets released on the 20th and takes some time due to overseas shipping I'll have to wait some more weeks) and I think I'll read The Silence of the Lambs (Read the first 2 books a long time ago but stopped right before lambs) before they arrive, or maybe Dazai's Schoolgirl - I think it is the only translated books of Dazai that I haven't yet read (Interestingly, there are two stories translated into German that never made it into English >.<). Originally I wanted to read TLODR (finally got the english books) or the Simplicius Simplicissimus but I think they are a bit too long to read before Monogatari arrives...

If anyone has some short novels to recommend.... I'm open to (almost) everything >.>

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 @efaardvark ever read The Uplift Saga? My favorite physics professor actually recommended it to me back in the day. I never finished the first book (life got in the way) but it was very good and might be right up your alley if you can find a copy. I totally understand the tech manuals thing. If I go hardcore on studying for a new certification exam, I'll be up to my ears in manuals all over again too.

@leinwandname  errrr....define short.... I'm guessing some of my 1000+ page favorites do not qualify. 😁

 

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1 hour ago, Beocat said:

 

@leinwandname  errrr....define short.... I'm guessing some of my 1000+ page favorites do not qualify. 😁<span>

 

 

Unless you consider War and Peace, Search for the Lost time and Bottom's Dream afternoon-reads. :P But if they're your favorites, sure, I'd gladly add them to my list! 

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@leinwandname okay...but you asked...  Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive series, starting with The Way of Kings (Goodreads link) is my definite recommendation to anyone who loves medieval settings with a great "magic" system. It isn't an easy read...the sure volume is immense, the characters are varied and many (some introduced here to be revisited in a later book even) and extremely well developed and introduced, but it delivers a story so entrancing that I couldn't put it, Words of Radiance, or Oathbringer down. I am blown away by every book and wishing the next were already out.  He also wrote the Mistborn series, which is probably more afternoon reading like you wanted and I'd highly recommend it as well.

 

If you want something shorter, I'd suggest The Noble Dead Saga from Barb and J.C. Hendee. It is a lot of books but more in the 200-300 page range. If you enjoy the writing and stories, Barb's Mist-Torn Witches series is set in the same world. In the Noble Dead it is easy in the first two books to see that they are new writers but they improve very quickly and the entire series is quite well imagined. Mist-Torn and Dead Seekers came last so they are very well written. :) I have more in store so if you enjoy those two series, let me know if you want more.

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@Beocat I've read the Stormlight Archive so far (and dang it, book 4 probably won't come until 2020!) and I have Mistborn on my to-read list - I think I might start this series now that it's quality was validated by you :P (apart from the fact that it's by Sanderson!)

The Noble Dead Saga, too, looks interesting. Definitely going to check that one out! Thank you! :-] 

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@leinwandname  I know! When I read his blog on that news, I was so sad.  2020 is a long ways away ☹  Mistborn will really make you think. It has a darker, dirtier world, but the main characters are no less compelling. Let me know what you think of Mistborn and the Noble Dead when you've been reading them. :)

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  • 5 months later...

I have begrudgingly started to read a book that I encourage everyone to read if you really hate having free time and want to understand exactly how ridiculously monotone federal historians used to be: The Staff Ride.  It's a US Army CMH handbook.  A whole 30 pages of the most mind-numbing, dense, and just plain depressing reading material.  Basically, it's to help a staff officer or an action officer conduct a historical staff ride of a significant location.  You can not possibly groan loud enough.

After this, however, I will be returning to Lords of the Sky by Dave Hampton.  It's a collection of stories from various aces from World War I through Desert Storm.  It's been interesting so far reading about just how complex air combat was in World War I - I hadn't really thought much about it until this book.  As a military historian it made me think a little bit more about the history of air power and how air power almost didn't make it in the U.S.  It's freaky now to think about, but that's almost where we were in the 1920s.  Sheesh!

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16 minutes ago, IIVIsouljam said:

@The History Kid.

Wow, Lords of the Sky sounds interesting. I might look into it myself! I had a curiosity in Fighter Aces during World War I. My favourite aircraft was the German Fokker Triplane. Only on the engineering of the aviation basis of course! I watched Hell's Angels purely for the dogfight shots. Anyway, definitely going to check it out! 

There's very few stories to tell, unfortunately - or perhaps unsurprisingly.  Most engagement of aircraft from World War I was limited to the few aircraft that actually had machine gun mounts.  You won't see any American pilots pop up in those stories despite the BAR coming onto the scene in 1918.  Some of the most intense air stories of World War I are actually the recon pilots.  We're talkin about a time where ground fire from single-shot or repeating rifles was capable of downing an aircraft not only due to their build, but the low altitude they had to fly.

There was an excellent anthology that someone had put together of both French and British pilots from World War I, but I can't recall the name right now.  More than half of them retold stories about pilots who just felt "lucky" a German pilot in front of them didn't happen to turn his head to see them in pursuit.

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On 3/14/2020 at 8:49 PM, RuthisianCodex said:

Currently reading Bag of Bones by Stephen King

I love Stephen King. 

I'm reading the Liar's Club, by Mary Karr. (Feeling thankful that the library gives online access to ebooks)

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm so happy this thread exists! I've been a bookworm my whole life. 

Currently reading a collection of works by Dostoevsky, also a few books on hold because of work and generally not feeling like reading those lately 😁

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On 4/22/2020 at 12:02 AM, Amali said:

Currently reading a collection of works by Dostoevsky, also a few books on hold because of work and generally not feeling like reading those lately 😁

I had started reading Russian literature such as Dostojewski and Tolstoi as well because they describe interesting cases to think about, but because I have to read so much for work, I never really finish a book. What do you think so far?

Edited by Illusion of Terra
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4 hours ago, Illusion of Terra said:

I had started reading Russian literature such as Dostojewski and Tolstoi as well because they describe interesting cases to think about, but because I have to read so much for work, I never really finish a book. What do you think so far?

Dostoevsky is my favourite author and because Russian is my native language I actually read the originals. What I like a out Russian classics is that the make you think. And because they show people's different personalities and thoughts in a very interesting ways. I think Tolstoy is famous for his descriptions (there a joke about a description of the ball going on and on in the War and Peace 😂). Dostoevsky's works are personality and society focused I think, at least going by my favourite books of his like, for example, the Idiot. 

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10 hours ago, Amali said:

Dostoevsky is my favourite author and because Russian is my native language I actually read the originals. What I like a out Russian classics is that the make you think.

it would be great if I could read them in Russian, but I don't know any Russian. the 'making you think' part is exactly why I wanted to read them. I am interested in their ideas and the interesting cases they describe. I enjoy thinking about stuff 😂 

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Thinking about re-reading The Chrysalids by John Wyndham. One of my favorite dystopian novels which has extra nostalgia for me as I read some of it when I was about 8 and then couldn't find what the title was until I was 18.

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On 4/26/2020 at 11:21 AM, Illusion of Terra said:

it would be great if I could read them in Russian, but I don't know any Russian. the 'making you think' part is exactly why I wanted to read them. I am interested in their ideas and the interesting cases they describe. I enjoy thinking about stuff 😂 

As long as you find good translations it is going to be interesting ;) For Dostoevsky's books, I'd recommend 'Crime and Punishment' and 'The Idiot', they're one of his most famous works along with 'The Karamazob Brothers', and they're definitely my favourites <3  Enjoy! :)))

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I am currently reading Sociobiology Examined, edited by Ashley Montagu. It is a pretty mixed book as the quality can vary with the contributions. On the whole, I am quite enjoying it though. I am also wanting to get back into reading The Marx - Engels Reader edited by Robert Tucker. I am about a 3rd of the way through it. At times it can be quite difficult to follow, to be perfectly honest. I am getting through it though. 

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